A conversation with Elise LeGrow

 

    We spoke with Elise LeGrow about writing with a novelist’s eye for detail, why the banal realities of being a human aren’t inherent, why any word can be weaponized and the physical objects in her direct proximity.

    Even the most banal realities of our lives require complex interpretation that only feels “normal” by rote. The intricacies of body language, facial expression — very little of this is inherent.

    1

    Morgan Enos

    I’m listening to your version of “You Never Can Tell” right now. It’s great, and reminds me of what a deeply descriptive writer Chuck Berry was. Are you thinking that some modern writers could learn from his novelist’s eye for detail?

    Elise LeGrow

    Absolutely. I think we all could learn from his lyric style and paint vivid imagery by focusing on the details. It’s the ability to say so much in so few words that makes any song (or poem) great.

    2

    Can you please describe the room you’re currently in in as much detail as possible, without telling me exactly what kind of room it is?

    Black and white honeycomb floor tiles, a swinging wooden door, salt and pepper shakers, coat rack, strawberry milkshake, my black purse on laminate table, a really old red fire alarm.

    3

    Please tell me about your personal interpretation of imagination, and how we all use, have or lack it. Do you think it informs even the most minute of our daily activities, or has it generally been weeded out in adults by the pressures of daily life?

    Even the most banal realities of our lives require complex interpretation that only feels “normal” by rote. The intricacies of body language, facial expression — very little of this is inherent. Rather we are taught how to interpret the world around us, the behaviors of others, the looks on their faces. Artists, though, I think are more aware of the act of interpretation and perhaps feel more free to interpret the shapes, words and music of others creatively.

    Using words to hurt people is wrong, but just about any word can be weaponized, so censorship is a slippery slope.

    4

    How much sunlight is coming through the nearest window in your proximity?

    Not much. It’s 5:40pm in late February in Toronto so the sun is well on its way down.

    5

    Can you tell me all about your genealogy and the origin of your family name? How far back do you remember in your ancestry?

    My family name is French and at one point was spelled “LeGros” with an s instead of a w. The direct translation is “the big”, which isn’t a coincidence — the men on my mom’s side are notoriously large. Even my girl cousin is 6’1″. I’m hoping to become more of an expert on my own ancestry, but at the moment there are gaps in my knowledge.

    6

    Please tell me everything you know about playing cards.

    Playing cards… hmm. Do you mean chess? I’m a terrible chess player. Way better at cards. I’m partial to cribbage and am learning to play poker! But not for a lot of money. Games are supposed to be lighthearted! As soon as you get too much money involved, it stops being fun — unless, of course, you’re winning.

    7

    I enjoy how everyone’s got their own “religion and politics” — in other words, topics that they just can’t breach. Can you remember the last time you accidentally offended someone’s decorum, even if you were saying or joking about something that tends to be innocent? And, what is the function of decorum at all to you?

    I don’t usually offend people, but I think some people are sensitive about “bad” words, which I use pretty freely. Using words to hurt people is wrong, but just about any word can be weaponized, so censorship is a slippery slope.

    8

    Finally, please tell me about the last thought in your mind that was jarring or unwanted.

    Unwanted thought… a moment ago, I had to confront the fact that this unseasonably warm and sunny day in Toronto will be followed by the return of winter tomorrow. I’m not looking forward to putting my parka back on.

    Thank you.

    Data


    Conversation: 156
    Curated by: Morgan Enos
    Conducted by: Email
    Published: March 29, 2018
    Total questions: 8
    Word count: 598
    Reading time: Two minutes
    Hyperlinks: 1

    Metadata


    Alarm: Present
    Origin: ∞
    Function: ∞
    Poker: Accessed
    Translation: ∞
    Decorum: Null

    Relation


    About the subject


    Elise LeGrow is a songwriter and recording artist from Toronto, Canada.

    About the curator


    Morgan Enos is a songwriter and journalist originally from California. His curatorial work for North of the Internet aims to strike a deeper place in his conversation subjects — the dreamy subtext to the linear everyday. Morgan also frequently writes power pop records as Other Houses about joy, outer space, frustration, chess and spiritual light. He resides in New York, where he continues to creatively fire on all cylinders.


    Related conversations W

    North of the Internet is a series of conversations with creative human beings.
    _

    Subscribe to our monthly newsletter

    © North of the Internet 2017 — ∞Dignity & Introspection _